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Thursday, 4 September 2014

Quote For The Day

    "Look at them, brainwashed imbeciles, Can you laugh, can you cry, can you think?"
                                                                         {Number 6 - Free For All}
    Number Six is of course referring to the twelve members of the Town Council. Although his remark could also be addressed to the eight members of the Council to whom Number Six was brought before because of his unmutualism, and eventually declared him as being disharmonious. Well the Chairman-Number 18 of the Committee declared Number Six disharmonious, as not one of the other Council members says one word! This in the same way that the Chairman of the Town Council is the only one to speak. In fact one could be forgiven for thinking that the Town Council and the Committee members are one and the same, not in persons, but being brainwashed! Certainly the surroundings of the domed chamber is the same, the steps that Number Six descends, and the circumstances relative, in the fact that Number Six is summoned and set within a circle.

Be seeing you

10 comments:

  1. To some degree (!) Number Six' stepping downstairs is very symbolic as a descent and the real beginning of a surreal nightmare that is what happens in "Free For All". At first and still in a realistic manner he makes his stand, pleads, showing the phoney Tally Ho headline to those present who, however, remain unimpressed. As it seems. After that, if I remember correctly, he is forwarded to the "truth test" and is transformed and "reborn" as the perfect candidate. So to speak. Regarding conventional plot development what we see looks somewhat rugged and heterogenous but every section, every part blends quite well into each other. Not many TV products succeeded in doing like this, perhaps TWIN PEAKS did sometimes (can't rememeber). The P09 on the other hand didn't. Too less. I know, David, we disagree here. - BCNU!

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    1. Hello Arno,
      One might also say that Number 6 in walking down the stairs is as descending into the underworld! Yes he is in a realistic manner, he is still himself, defiant, rebellious. As you say he is forewarned about having to face the test, I don't know why because they already knew what was in Number 6's mind, his motivation for standing for election. But having faced the "Truth Test," Number 6's mind was also conditioned, and he was no longer quite himself, yet as still prepared to give Number 2 a "run for his money!"
      And yes I would agree what you say about the plot development, every section and scene does blend very well. And yes "Twin Peaks" did to some extent. I'm a fan of "Twin Peaks," I was easily captivated by it, but have not watched the series in a long time. With THEPRIS6NER-09 we agree to differ but there is nothing wrong in that. I simply see with THEPRIS6NER that less as being more, and I wouldn't expect you to agree, as I know your views, and respect them.

      Very kind regards
      David
      BCNU

      Delete
  2. Hello Arno and David,

    I like that thought regarding Number 6 descending, into the underworld. In Free For All the steps even seem to be the first stage only, so to say, and the second stage begins when his podium spins around and is lowered to the actual "underworld". When he emerges again he is someone else.

    Also, it's interesting that the "mock authorities" and true mechanics of the Village can be found downstairs. This way the individual is set higher. In rank?

    Very kind regards,
    Jana
    BCNU

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    1. Hello Jana,
      Very nicely put if I may say so. Number 6 descends into the "Underworld" like Orpheus descending int the Underworld, although for quite a different reason.
      The original legend is that Orpheus the son of Calliope and Apollo. He was also an Argonaut, after sailing to Colchis with the Argonauts he married Eurydice and settled in Thrace. One day, Aristaeus, also the son of Apollo, but by the nymph Cyrene, tried to seduce his half sister-in-law, but whilst trying to escape, she trod on a serpent and died. She descended in Tartarus, whence Orpheus bravely followed to search for her. With his music he charmed the ferryman Charon, the three-headed dog Cerberus, and the three judges of the dead. He also soothed the savage breast of Pluto (Hades) {music makes for a quiet mind} that he gave him permission to take his wife back to Earth, there was one condition. Eurydice was to walk behind him all the way, but if he looked back he would lose her. They set off for the upper world with Eurydice following the sound of her husband's lyre through the dark passages, but when he reached the sunlight Orpheus looked back to make sure she was following, and he lost her forever.
      But as you say, Number 6 emerges from the "Underworld" as someone else. And I like the idea that Number 6 isn't questioning the members of the Town Council, but that he's mocking authority, the "mechanics" of The Village. He does that again when he's brought before the Committee in 'A Change of Mind, mocking them when he tears up the questionaire, and when the Chairman of the Committee says he is there to deal with his complaints, Number 6 says "Well done, I have several!"

      Very best regards
      David
      BCNU

      Delete
  3. Hey, hey, David! That's quite a lot of knowledge about ancient mythology! I could have told perhaps only half that quantity (during our Latin lessons at school we read one poem on that subject written by Ovid). Only for the record, while in the "Dance" episode the trial against No. 6 takes place in the Town Hall, disguised as a carnival party, this particular tribunal now is in the basement, the underworld of the Village, the "truth test" even deeper. Whereas Kafka's "Trial" is located in the attic of a rather seedy building. - BCNU!

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    1. Hello Arno,
      I hadn't thought of the Committee being in the basement of the Underworld, that's very good, I obvously didn't think deep enough! And the "truth test" being conducted even deeper. And yet he came out of the Labour Exchange, on ground level!
      This is beginning to sound like Dante's Inerno and the nine cirlces of Hell. But its Saturday morning, so we won't go there, far too deep for me at the moment!

      Very kind regards
      David
      BCNU

      Delete
  4. If I remember well enough, there's a scene in - again - Kafka's "Trial", and my guess would be it's in the film version, when K leaves the court of justice through labyrinthine corridors, up and down, he suddenly finds himself on ground level again, thus matching the remotest with the nearest. That's as vaguely as I'm able to describe. - BCNU!

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    1. Hello Arno,
      Mmmmm, Now which of the films of 'The Trial' are we talking about here? I have just checked the version starring Anthony Hopkins, and K goes through a labyrinth of housing on his way to the the Court of Justice, but we do not see him leave. So I guess you are referring to the Orson Wells version, which I do not like at all, and have only watched once.

      Very kind regards
      David
      BCNU

      Delete
  5. Not the Hopkins film, David! And, admittedly, I not even 100% sure that it's the Welles version. It could well be in the novel. Anyway. There's a significance about Kafka's writings that has been described as the "contiguity" (side by side, touching) as opposed to what we know as "continuity" (things that extend and beloning together). Seemingly unrelated and disjointed facts that, given a change of perspective, touch each other thus matching closeness and distance. Partly very academic stuff; read more if you want: http://www.englweb.umd.edu/englfac/KChuh/D%26G.pdf - BCNU!

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    1. Hello Arno,
      I have to admit that I've not read the Kafka's novel 'The Trial' for years. I shall have to refresh my memory!

      Very kind regards
      David
      BCNU

      Delete