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Monday, 29 May 2017

The Therapy Zone

    I wonder how Number 1 feels with so many Number 2’s who fail in their tasks? Is he frustrated by it, or is he elated to see Number 6 doing so well? If we are to take it literally that Number 1 and Number 6 are one and the same person, it looks like Number 1 wants Number 6 to suffer for acting the way he had, for resigning for peace of mind, for betraying Number 1’s beliefs. So Number 2 has to put Number 6 though a series of ordeals, as Number 1 wants Number 6 tested to his limit. There might also be an element of punishment involved, but only up to a point. Number 6 mustn’t be broken, they do not want to end up with a man of fragments. Number 6 must be taught the error of his ways.
    The trouble with it is that until ‘Fall Out’ we’re not supposed to know who Number 1 is. If its not Number 6’s other self, then it’s someone else. That someone else would want to know the reason why Number 6 resigned, presumably so that he could pass the answer onto someone back in
London. On the other hand, if Number 1 and Number 6 are one and the same, there can be no question as to the resignation. Number 1 should know why Number 6 resigned.
   Does Number 6 feel guilty for that resignation? I don’t know, he probably didn’t take the decision to resign lightly, and agonized over it afterwards as we know. Number 6 wanting peace of mind, how dare he! Number 1 wouldn’t put up with that! Number 1 has power, and position, and Number 6’s resignation is a danger that could take all that power and position away. Number 6 is a danger to The Village!
   We know that Number 1 is Number 6, Number 1 must know he’s Number 6. But the thing is Number 6 doesn’t seem to know he’s Number 1, not until the encounter in ‘Fall out.’ It is said that Number 6 is told he’s Number 1 during the opening sequence, but that all depends on where one places the emphasis. Otherwise Number 2 is simply telling the Prisoner he’s Number 6.
  
Be seeing you

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